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KRINK: DRIP INK GRAFFITI

A cool expose on graf artist KRINK.

Craig Costello, has been making graf history and as a graffiti artist and the mastermind behind KRINK. He’s created a notorious brand responsible for cool drip style markers, mops, and fire extinguishers.

As a punk kid growing up in Queens, Craig would scavenge for supplies to paint the walls and buildings of New York. His desire to create larger pieces and invent unique graffiti tools led to the development of his internationally recognized ink and paint brand Krink Inc. Craig’s signature style morphed out of his modifications and innovations with paint tools; using a fire extinguisher filled with paint and paint markers rather than spray paint, his style became an instant hit in many cities around the world.

Do what you love, and the rest falls into place.

BTSOE: DON'T MISS OUT

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Please join us from September 18-20, at Mario Barth’s annual, “Biggest Tattoo Show on Earth”. This annual event attracts artists from all around the world and it will showcase the most talented artists in the arenas of black and grey and color tattoos. It’s one of the biggest shows in the circuit, and a show that you shouldn’t miss out on if you love the culture of tattoos and art.

With more than 40,000 attendees, over 1,000 featured artists and plenty of celebs, the stage is set for an experience which will also include appearances by Jeremy of Five Finger Death Punch, David Labreva (Happy from Sons of Anarchy) as well as DJ Colleen Shannon. We’ll see you all soon and you can click here for more information.

 

BANKSY'S DISMALAND.

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Banksy’s latest public art installation is perhaps the biggest he’s done. His art show has a canvas which is essentially a 2.5-acre seafront site in Weston-super-Mare which features Cinderella crash scene, post-riot model village and cardboard airport securityLooking more like a post-apocalyptic Disneyland, his latest creation is an installation called “Dismaland”.

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Only four people at the local council in the UK knew about the project, while most of the general public were led to believe that it was a set for an upcoming movie. The artist, who maintains his anonymity, called it “a festival of art, amusements and entry-level anarchism. This is an art show for the 99% who’d rather be at Alton Towers.”

There is much to laugh at – the “I am an imbecile” helium balloons, the back-of-your-head caricature artist – but a big chunk of it is deadly serious and overtly political.

 

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CREATIVITY: THE AXE TABLE

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The art of tattoo is about creativity. It’s about reinventing the wheel and improving your skills and techniques time after time. That said, the same holds true about any artist and that’s exactly the case with UK based artists Duffy London.

His concept for this cool table was realized when playing with the illusion of an axe and the concept of gravity, geometery and illusion. The table, which is called the “Woodsman Axe Table” is about combining four polished hickory axes as legs and combining them with a slab of wood with natural edges.

It’s a distinct table with a very unique look, and it’s not only a great conversation piece but also an inspirational one that’ll get the gears in your head turning.

 

 

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THE BALANCING ACT.

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While working on his canvas for the show, Infinite Tide, which showcases next week, Robert’s daughter got in on the action and created a canvas of her own. Precious moments like these are both priceless and powerful, while serving as visual reminders as to why we work so hard.

To build a strong family unit requires countless hours of work, and while the stress and strife of the daily grind may consume us, we do it to sustain and enrich life. In return we’re rewarded with the money that can afford us shelter and provide food on the table, yet the one thing it can never buy or replace is the quality time spent with our kids.

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Spending quality time with his family has always been a priority for Robert, and these candid moments captured by his talented wife are also proof that artistic genes run in the family. Robert would also be the first to tell you that dividing his time between work and family is a struggle, but ask anyone who’s living and breathing in the modern world and they’ll be sure to agree.

That said, life is about balance and there is no formula to perfection. The only thing we can do is try our best to set boundaries and limits, in hopes to capture moments like those seen here. Yet while you’re on the search for the perfect balance all you can do is learn to appreciate the little things, work hard and talk less. So get out there and make moves while trying to build movements, invest in yourself, dream big and love unconditionally.

 

FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER….

Over the past decade, tattoo artist Robert Pho, has received global acclaim as being one of the leading black and grey tattoo artists in the industry. Known best for his attention to detail, and his ability to create hyperrealistic portraits, Robert continues to hone his skills and master his craft, yet one little known fact about this humble artist is that he is also a painter.

Now what one may find most interesting about Robert, is the fact that he specializes in black and grey tattoos, but paints in color. It’s an anomaly which even he can’t explain, but there’s no question that his paintings hold the same depth as his tattoo work.

Robert’s collection of his own personal work, which has never been seen – or shown – to the general public, is what he refers to as a “passion project.” Each piece is inspired by culture, religion and history, and while he still chooses to keep them private, he has decided to create for the first time ever, a piece which will be showcased to the public.

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This new piece was created specifically for  “Infinite Tide.”  The 16×24 mixed media canvas works around this years “ocean theme” and the idea behind his latest work centers around the transfer of knowledge, and the concept that both history and art is impermeable to nature, but susceptible to social distortion.

He further mentions that, “the piece was created to show that art can be visually admired, while the stories and factual truths behind the artifacts can only be passed on by the voice of each generation. In short, I believe that it’s up to make sure that the history is told as accurately as the art is drawn.”

 

About Kulture Klash: Curated by Tim Shelton of Still Life Tattoo, and Sullen Clothing, the gallery will showcase world Renowned Tattoo, Street, Contemporary, Low-Brow and Kustom Kulture artists. Housed in Ballroom Galleries aboard Queen Mary, the show will also extend to cover the countless structures off ship as they line walk ways and corridors filled with fine art, street art, and low brow art to bring together collectors from around the world. 

 

 

RETRO DESIGN EXERCISE: THE BMW 3.0 CSL

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If you’re a car buff or grew up as a teen back in the 70’s, then you already know about the 1972 BMW 3.0 CSL. It was a dreamy car of smooth and dreamy proportions, and it was a flagship design which till today continues to be a cult classic. Built to comply with homologation standards for European Touring Car Championship racing. The production on the elongated 3.0CSL didn’t last two long and the production ended in 1973 with dramatic body modifications including roof mounted spoiler as well as a batmobile-eque rear spoiler.

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In honor of that vehicle, BMW honored this classic at the Concorso d’Eleganza Vila d’Este with its 3.0 CSL Hommage. Exterior design is bold, sharing similar elements of the heritage model such sculpted front and rear spoilers that blend right into the hood and wheel wells. While aluminum was material of choice of racing vehicles in the 70s, carbon fiber reigns supreme now and the 3.0CSL has more than its fair share of it.

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CREATE: ART IS EVERYWHERE IF YOU HAVE VISION.

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Sometimes it’s not about what you see. It’s about what you envision and what you’re willing to create.

Check out this cool illusion waiting by Daneil Siering and Mario Shu. The dynamic duo from Potsdam, Germany, wrapped this unsuspecting tree in plastic sheeting and then mimicked the background using spray paint cans. Similar in fashion to this mirror installation by Joakim Kaminsky and Maria Poll, the art piece is one that can truly be experienced and enjoyed while seeing it live.

GALLERY UPDATES: ROBERT PHO

 

 

 

 

 

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Robert Pho’s gallery has been updated with new photos. Please click here to view.

INSPIRATION: SURREAL DRAWINGS.

These amazing drawings are sure to inspire, and they may even influence your next tattoo. Drawn by artist, Laurie Lipton, she’s made a career drawing these grim masterpieces. Now while most artists are trying to find themselves, Laurie Lipton said she never had to “find” the art inside of her. Instead, she says that art was always a part of her. Much like her blue eyes, and left-handedness, it was a part of her DNA and it wasn’t till she was in her 20’s that she officially called herself an “artist.”
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When asked about her inspirations, she references books, television, the news and just about everything around her. She says that her initial mind-opening inspirations have been the Flemish Masters from the early Renaissance/late Medieval period and the photographer, Diane Arbus. Artists like Durer, Rembrandt, Breugal, Bosch, and Memling showed me how to create worlds using the tiniest of lines and the most exquisite details. They weren’t “surrealists”, they weren’t “realists”, they were somewhere in-between. Diane Arbus showed me the power of black & white. She inspired my color choice.
BEST & WORST ADVICE SHE’S EVER HEARD?

Worst advice: add color.
Best advice: shut up and draw.
Her only medium is pencil, charcoal pencil and paper and now that her career is getting put on the map, she does say that he hardest part of her career and biggest lesson she’s learned has been trying to make a living without compromising her vision. She’s been a waitress, worked in box offices, bars, whatever, in order to afford to make her art. She goes on to say that very few artists can support themselves from their art work. It’s not easy & takes time. The biggest lesson I’ve learned? Not to listen to anyone when they say, “Do it this way & you’ll make more money.” Selling out doesn’t work. Feeling passionate about what you’re creating works.